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Resources

With all family members

Circles of Safety and Support — This tool is a practical and visual cue to identify those who can or could provide the child with safety and support

The Three Houses — A familiar tool for most practitioners, the Three Houses can be used to explore the acts of violence and other behaviours that frighten and worry the child — as well as what worries they have for others. It can help explore protective factors that can shape safety and case planning and create a picture of what needs to change for the child to feel safe and happy. This can be a powerful motivator for change for the man using violence.

The Future House — The Future House will help you talk with family members about what needs to happen to make a child safe.

The Family Roadmap — is a visual and collaborative tool to help families have their say in developing case plan goals and action steps.  This tool explores life at its best and worst and identify barriers to change.  Identifying strengths and resources a family has or needs is a critical part of this tool.   

Positive Parenting cards are a tool for opening up conversations and storytelling with parents about their experiences, struggles, ideas and hopes for their children and for themselves as parents.

A genogram is a pictorial displays of a young person's family relationships and other factors, such as medical history and complicating factors. The genogram can be used to source family members, who may reach out to support the young person. The department has access to genoware software to assist in the development of digital genograms.

An eco-map like genograms are a visual tool that ca provide very useful information for practitioners and families in the process of developing case plans. Whilst genograms provide an historical picture of the family and the links across and between generations, eco-maps locate the family in their current social context and provide a visual map of the family’s connections to the external world.

With the mother

Daisy domestic violence app — The Daisy app connects you to domestic and family violence support services in your local area. The app, developed by 1800RESPECT, is free to download, and has a great safety feature. Please note that an app on a woman victims' phone may escalate risk in some circumstances.

1800 Respect — Phone and online counselling for women experiencing violence. The website has information on keeping kids safe.

Berry Street Childhood Institute

The 10 fact sheets can be downloaded here for free:

  • Brochure 1: Parenting, violence and your safety: who can help
  • Brochure 2: Pregnancy and violence
  • Brochure 3: Parenting a baby who has experienced violence: birth to 18 months
  • Brochure 4: Parenting a toddler who has experienced violence: 1.5 to 3 years
  • Brochure 5: Parenting a pre-schooler who has experienced violence: 3 to 5 years
  • Brochure 6: Parenting a primary schooler who has experienced violence: 5 to 12 years
  • Brochure 7: Parenting a teenager who has experienced violence: 13 to 18 years
  • Brochure 8: The effects of violence on children’s behaviour
  • Brochure 9: Parenting: Talking about separating, moving house and seeing dad
  • Brochure 10: Parenting, violence and the legal system

With the father

Men’s Line — MensLine Australia is a professional telephone and online support and information service for Australian men. Men can call this 24/7 hotline to get help managing their emotions and relationships.

Handbook for men concerned about their abusive behaviour towards those they love — This is an interactive handbook for men who are concerned their behaviours are hurting those they love and want to make changes to improve their relationships.

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