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Glossary

Use the glossary to find definitions of terms used in our manual.

  • Able and willing

    Child Protection Act 1999, section 10. A parent may be willing to protect a child, but not have the means or capacity to do so. For example, a parent with a diagnosed mental illness may express a willingness to protect their child, however, due to factors related to the mental illness, is not able to do so. Alternatively, a parent may have the means and capacity to protect a child, but may not do so. If a child resides across two households, the ability and willingness of both parents to protect the child needs to be assessed.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family led decision making

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Led Decision Making is a practice approach in which an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander facilitator, who is not a child safety employee, supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families in taking the lead in making decisions and plans and taking action to meet the safety, belonging and wellbeing needs of the child. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family led decision making enhances cultural safety and maximises participation of the child and their family.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Wellbeing Service

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Wellbeing Services (FWS) are community controlled family support services that work with families as early as possible, providing tailored, culturally safe support to improve their wellbeing and prevent their problems from escalating.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Practice Leader

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Practice Leader is a regional position that leads the development of culturally capable child protection practice.
  • Aboriginal person

    A person of Aboriginal descent who identifies as Aboriginal and is accepted as such by the community in which he or she lives. 
  • Aboriginal tradition and Island custom

    The meaning of Aboriginal tradition and Island custom is in accordance with the definitions in the Acts Interpretation Act 1954

    Aboriginal tradition is defined as the body of traditions, observances, customs and beliefs of Aboriginal people generally or of a particular community or group of Aboriginal people, and includes any such traditions, observances, customs and beliefs relating to particular persons, areas, objects or relationships.

    Island custom is defined as the body of traditions, observances, customs and beliefs of Torres Strait Islanders generally or of a particular community or group of Torres Strait Islanders, and includes any such traditions, observances, customs and beliefs relating to particular persons, areas, objects or relationships.

  • Abusive action

    An incident of abuse that results in harm to a child including a parent's failure to protect a child from abuse caused by another person.
  • Achievement and Capability Plan

    An achievement and capability plan (ACP) is an active record that assists Child Safety staff to track their progress in meeting the service delivery expectations of their role as well as mapping out their professional development goals.  As part of supervision, the ACP is completed through a discussion or a series of discussions with the staff member's supervisor. 
  • Additional Child Care Subsidy

    The Additional Child Care Subsidy (ACCS) is an Australian government payment that gives eligible families extra assistance with the cost of child care. All children in foster or kinship care who have been assessed as being in need of protection under the Child Protection Act 1999 may automatically satisfy the ‘at risk’ threshold for the Additional Child Care Subsidy (child wellbeing) and have reduced child care costs.
  • Additional Child Care Subsidy - Child Wellbeing

    The Additional Child Care Subsidy is an Australian government payment that gives eligible families extra assistance with the cost of child care. One of the four categories of Additional Child Care Subsidy is ‘Child Wellbeing’.  All children in foster or kinship care who have been assessed as being in need of protection under the Child Protection Act 1999 may automatically satisfy the ‘at risk’ threshold for the Additional Child Care Subsidy (child wellbeing) and have reduced child care costs.
  • Additional notified concerns (ANC)

    Additional notified concerns (ANC) are new concerns received about a child, where there is already an open notification or investigation and assessment event in ICMS, that require screening to determine Child Safety's response.
  • Administrative Appeals Tribunal

    The Administrative Appeals Tribunal conducts independent merits review of administrative decisions made under Commonwealth laws, and in limited circumstances, decisions made by state government and non-government organisations. It was established by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975 and reviews decisions relating to the National Disability Insurance Scheme. It may affirm or vary a decision, set aside a decision and substitute a new decision, or remit a decision to the decision maker for reconsideration.

  • Adoption

    A legal process under the Adoption Act 2009 by which a child legally becomes a child of the adoptive parents and legally ceases to be a child of his or her existing parents.
  • Adoption and permanent care services

    Adoption and Permanent Care Services, Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women, is responsible for providing services in Queensland for:

    • parents considering adoption for their children
    • children requiring adoptive placements
    • people seeking to adopt children
    • people seeking information or to lodge a contact statement in relation to a past adoption.
    • unaccompanied humanitarian minors.
    It also provides support and advice in relation to permanency planning for children in the child protection system.
  • Adoption care agreement

    An adoption care agreement under the Adoption Act 2009, section 50, allows a child to be placed in a care arrangement with the parent's consent while the parent is considering adoption for the child. While the care agreement is in force, the chief executive has custody of the child and may place the child in care under the Child Protection Act 1999, chapter 2, part 6, division 4. A child may be placed subject to an adoption care agreement for a maximum period of one year.
  • Adverse childhood experiences

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) are traumatic events in a child's life which may have negative and lasting effects on health and wellbeing. These experiences occur before the age of 18 and are remembered by the person when they are an adult. Maltreatment (for example abuse, neglect, bullying) and other aspects of the child's environment (such as parental substance misuse or mental health issues) that can undermine the child's sense of safety, stability and bonding can cause chronic stress that can disrupt early brain development, and the development of the nervous and immune systems. 

  • Aggrieved person

    The legal term used to refer to a person:
    • defined in the Child Protection Act 1999, schedule 2, who may apply, as provided for under the QCAT Act, to QCAT for a decision to be reviewed; or
    • who experiences domestic or family violence.  If the Queensland Police Service (QPS) believes an aggrieved person is in immediate danger, QPS can take the respondent (the person who commits domestic violence) into custody for up to 4 hours and apply for a protection order. 
  • Alcohol and Other Drugs Services

    Alcohol and Other Drug Services (AOD) Services provide people  with a range of interventions that influence and support the decision to reduce or cease harmful substance use. Referrals can be made by an individual experiencing the problem, community services, hospital and health services, GPs, police, courts and Corrective Services. 
  • Alert

    In ICMS, an alert is applied to a person record to record risks, behaviours or other details about a child, family member or carer, that need to be brought to the attention of Child Safety or Youth Justice staff to ensure a matter is appropriately considered when providing services.   An alert is created to identify something of significance (for example, a suicide or domestic and family violence risk) is relevant to a child, family member or carer.
  • Another entity

    The Child Protection Act 1999, section 82(1)(f), allows for a child to be placed in the care of another entity, other than an approved carer or licensed care service, only when that entity is the most appropriate for meeting the child's particular protection and care needs.
  • Approved carer

    Approved carers are people in whose care a child has been placed by the chief executive, and include approved foster carers, approved kinship carers and provisionally approved carers.
  • Assessment

    Assessment is the process of gathering, analysing and interpreting information to inform decision-making and planning. 
  • Assessment and service connect

    Assessment and service connect is a model in which Child Safety works with families, in partnership with assessment and service connect co-responder services, to complete an investigation and assessment and determine ongoing service provision.
  • Assessment and service connect co-response

    When investigating and assessing notifications, Child Safety may partner with non-government and government service providers, including funded assessment and service connect (ASC) service providers, to:
    • effectively engage with the child and their family
    • assess whether the child is in need of protection
    • prevent future harm to children
    • increase safety, belonging and wellbeing through intervention.
  • Assessment care agreement

    An assessment care agreement allows a child to be placed in an approved care arrangement by Child Safety, with the parent's consent, to ensure the child's safety during an investigation and assessment. An assessment care agreement is for a maximum of 30 days and the parents retain custody and guardianship of the child.
  • Assessment order

    An assessment order is a short term order that may be granted by either a magistrate or the court, under the Child Protection Act 1999, to allow a range of activities to occur to complete an investigation and assessment, when a parent has not given consent for these actions to occur (refer to Temporary assessment order and Court assessment order).
  • Attachment

    Attachment refers to a deep and enduring emotional bond that connects one person with another. It is a concept used to explain the emergence of an emotional bond between an infant and a primary caregiver and the way this affects the child's behavioural and emotional development into adulthood. 

  • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder which affects how a person's nervous system develops. It impacts on and impairs how a person thinks and acts. A person with ADHD usually has problems focusing and remembering what is said or done around them. Thy can be impulsive and may also have extra trouble sitting still or being quiet. 

  • Australian Immunisation Register

    The Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) is a national register, administered by the Australian Department of Human Services, in which vaccinations are recorded.

  • Authorised officer

    A person appointed to one of a range of positions in Child Safety that the chief executive authorises under the Child Protection Act 1999, section 149 to exercise specified powers.
  • Authorised representative

    Someone who can manage a My Health Record on someone's behalf. For children under 14 years in the custody or guardianship of the Chief Executive, the child's CSO will be their authorised representative and can make decisions about how their health information is managed and accessed by others.
  • Autism spectrum disorder

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a brain-based, developmental condition that affects the way a person relates to their environment. A child with ASD can have communication difficulties, narrow interests and repetitive behaviour. The word spectrum is used because not all people with ASD have the same needs. 

  • Bail

    The release (from the custody of a police officer or by a Magistrate) of a defendant, who has been charged with an offence, until a later court appearance.
  • Belonging

    The focus of every interaction and intervention within the Framework for Practice is on achieving enduring safety, belonging and wellbeing for children. In this context, belonging refers to providing a child with the opportunity to develop strong, meaningful, lifelong connections with family, extended family, community and culture. The connections may be with the family a child was born into or with the family they grow up in.

  • Blue card

    The Blue Card system determines who is eligible to work in child-related employment, carry on a child-related business, or provide foster or kinship care under the Child Protection Act 1999, including adult members of a carer's household. A Blue Card 'or 'Working with Children' check assesses an applicant's national criminal history,  disciplinary information held by certain professional organisations, and relevant information from the Queensland Police Commissioner - even if no charges were laid.
  • CAO

    A court assessment order (CAO) is an order made under the Child Protection Act 1999, chapter 2, to authorise actions necessary as part of an investigation and assessment to determine whether a child is in need of protection, if:
    • the child's parents have not provided their consent for these actions or the parents' consent cannot be obtained
    • it is considered that it will take more than three business days to complete the investigation and assessment.
  • Care agreement

    An agreement between Child Safety and a child's parents to place their child in an approved care arrangement for a short period of time. There are two types of care agreements that allow a child to be placed in a care arrangement with the parent's agreement. Refer to 'Assessment care agreement' and/or  'Child protection care agreement'.
  • Care arrangement

    A child may be 'placed' in an approved care arrangement, under the authority of the Child Protection Act 1999. The words 'placement' and 'care arrangement' have the same meaning.
  • Care arrangement matching

    Care arrangement matching refers to the process of identifying a potential carer family , whose motivation, characteristics, skills and experience will, as far as possible, meet the assessed needs of the child or sibling group. This process takes into account the assessment information specific to the child, primarily known to Child Safety, as well as carer assessment information specific to the carer, primarily known to the foster and kinship care service.
  • Carepay

    Carepay is the system used to manage foster and kinship care allowances and associated payments to approved foster, kinship and provisionally approved carers. Carepay works in conjunction with ICMS to calculate carer payments.

  • Carer business discount card

    The carer business discount card entitles approved foster and kinship carers to a range of discounts on goods and services from participating businesses in Queensland.  The card is automatically sent to a carer within 20 business days of their approval and it remains valid while they continue to be an approved foster or kinship carer.
  • Carer Connect

    Carer Connect is a web and mobile - friendly app that has been developed to provide carers with improved and secure access to information and support. The app draws information from ICMS and is available to carers.
  • Carer entity

    A carer entity is a record created in ICMS that refers to a group of one or more people who provide family-based care and hold a certificate of approval to provide foster care or kinship care, or are provisionally approved to care for a specific child for a time limited period.
  • Case management

    Child Safety's overall responsibility is to effectively managing statutory intervention in the life of a child and family. Case management is a way of working with children and families and collaborating with other agencies to provide coordinated, culturally sensitive, integrated and targeted services to meet the needs and goals of children and their families.
  • Case plan

    A case plan for a child is a written plan for meeting the child's protection and care needs. It is developed in a participative process between the department, a child, the child's family and other people of significance to the child and family. It records the goal and outcomes of ongoing intervention and identifies the agreed tasks that will occur to meet the goal and outcomes.
  • Case plan review

    A process of reviewing a case plan, based on an up-to-date assessment of the progress made toward the case plan goal. It includes a reassessment of risk, safety, strengths and needs. The outcome of a case plan review is a completed review report and a new (revised) case plan.
  • Case planning

    Case planning is a participative process of planning strategies to address a child's protection and care needs and promote a child's wellbeing. It is made up of a cycle of assessment, planning, implementation and review.
  • Case responsibility

    Case responsibility refers to the actions required of the allocated CSO in undertaking statutory intervention with a child and their family. Case responsibility can relate to the completion of an investigation and assessment or the ongoing intervention case management processes of assessment, planning, implementation and review, until case closure.
  • Case work

    Case work refers to the day-to-day actions undertaken by the CSO with case responsibility and other relevant people who are undertaking statutory intervention with a child and their family.
  • CCR

    A child concern report is a record of child protection concerns received by Child Safety that do not meet the threshold for a notification.
  • Central Screening Unit

    The Central Screening Unit (CSU) is the Child Safety Unit responsible for undertaking personal and criminal history checks of prospective or existing foster and kinship carers and adult members of their households in accordance with the Child Protection Act 1999, section 135.  The Central Screening Unit also undertakes personal history screening of all employees, managers, directors and nominees of licensed care services.

  • Certificate of approval

    The authority provided to an approved carer, once the chief executive has made the decision to grant a foster or kinship carer application, or provisionally approve a carer.
  • Charter of rights

    The charter of rights for a child in care are set out in the Child Protection Act 1999, schedule 1 and section 74 requires the chief executive to ensure the charter of rights are complied with. It also requires children to be told about the charter, having regard to their age and ability to understand, and to be told about the public guardian and other entities that can help them if their rights are not being complied with. 

  • Chief executive

    Unless otherwise specified, refers to the Director-General of the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women.
  • Child

    A child or young person who is under 18 years of age.
  • Child Abuse and Sexual Crime Group

    Part of Queensland Police Service, this group focuses on vulnerable children and victims including victims of sexual abuse. CASCG is made up of a number of specialist investigative units and multi-agency teams:
    • Child Protection Offender Register (CPOR)
    • ARGOS internet child exploitation unit
    • Child Trauma Unit (CTU)
    • Sexual Crimes Unit
    • Blue Card Operations and SCAN (Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect) Team.
  • Child advocate functions

    The Public Guardian has child advocate functions that it performs for children in the child protection system, as set out in section 13 of the Public Guardian Act 2014. These functions are delegated  to community visitors and child advocate legal officers.
  • Child concern report

    A child concern report (CCR) is a record of child protection concerns received by the department that does not meet the threshold for a notification. A CSO may respond to a CCR by providing information and advice, making a referral to an appropriate agency, or providing information to the police or another state authority.
  • Child exploitation material

    Material that is likely to cause offence to a reasonable adult, that describes or depicts a person, or a representation of a  child under 16 years—
    • in a sexual context, including for example, engaging in a sexual activity; or
    • in an offensive or demeaning context; or
    • being subjected to abuse, cruelty or torture.
  • Child health passport

    The child health passport is a folder containing the child's health information that Child Safety provides to a carer to assist them in meeting the child's day-to-day health needs. Contents include the child information form, health plan, photocopy of the Medicare card, and information relating to specific health needs of the child. The passport moves with the child if the child moves to another care arrangement and a copy is provided to the parent when the child returns home or to the young person when they transition from care.
  • Child in care

    Refers to a child who is placed in a care arrangement under the authority of the Child Protection Act 1999, section 82(1) and 51ZD(3).
  • Child in need of protection

    A child who has suffered harm, is suffering harm, or is at unacceptable risk of suffering from harm, and does not have a parent able and willing to protect the child from the harm (Child Protection Act 1999, section 10).
  • Child maintenance order

    A child maintenance order is an order made by the Family Court of Australia about the payment of child support.
  • Child placement principle

    The Child Placement Principle (CPP),  Child Protection Act 1999 , section 5C  are  applied in administering the Child Protection Act 1999  when working with Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children and families. Decisions about an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child must be made in a way that upholds the 5 elements of the child placement principle:
    • Prevention - that a child has the right to be brought up within the child’s own family and community
    • Participation - that a child and the child’s parents and family members have the right to participate in an administrative or judicial process for making a significant decision about a child
    • Partnership - that Aboriginal or Torres Strait islander peoples have the right to participate in significant decisions under the Child Protection Act 1999 about Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander children, including the design and delivery of programs and services
    • Placement - that if a child is to be placed in care, the child has a right to be placed with a member of the child’s family group
    • Connection - that a child has a right to be supported to develop and maintain a connection with the child’s family, community, culture, traditions and language.
  • Child Protection and Investigation Unit

    The Child Protection and Investigation Unit is the Queensland Police Service unit, responsible for the investigation of crimes committed against children.
  • Child protection care agreement

    A child protection care agreement (CPCA) allows a child who has been determined to be in need of protection to be placed by the department in a care placement to ensure their safety. A child protection care agreement may be used during intervention with parental agreement or ongoing intervention with a directive or supervision order. The child protection care agreement gives custody of the child to the chief executive while the agreement is in force. It can be for an initial period of 30 days and can be extended more than once.
  • Child Protection Guide

    The Child Protection Guide is a web-based decision support tool to assist professionals in deciding where to refer or report concerns about a child's safety or wellbeing. 
  • Child protection history

    Refers to personal information about a person held by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women or another government department or agency in Australia or overseas with statutory responsibility for child protection.

    All information received or held by Child Safety is used to provide for the protection of children as required under the Child Protection Act 1999.

  • Child Protection Liaison Officer

    The Child Protection Liaison Officer (CPLO) within each Queensland Health Service District is the Queensland Health contact person for Child Safety staff. The CPLO will be able to advise Child Safety staff about the model of care within their district and the health professionals within the local area who are able to conduct health assessments and develop health plans. In their role they may be able to advise on and facilitate appropriate referral processes, and they will act as the main liaison link for other health professionals within the health service district.
  • Child protection order

    A child protection order is an order made by the Childrens Court under the Child Protection Act 1999, when a child is assessed to be in need of protection. There are different types of child protection orders, depending on a child and family's situation, including directive orders, supervision orders, custody orders and guardianship orders. 
  • Child protection warrant

    This is an option in the ICMS Alerts drop down list which is selected to indicate that a warrant for the apprehension of a child, under Part 3 of the Child Protection Act 1999  has been issued.
  • Child Safety After Hours Service Centre

    The Child Safety After Hours Service Centre (CSAHSC) is a 24 hour Child Safety service that provides after business hours responses to clients of Child Safety, the community, other government departments and community agencies in response to child protection matters.
  • Child Safety Officer

    A child safety officer (CSO) is an authorised officer under the Child Protection Act 1999, and is responsible for delivering statutory child protection services, such as investigating and assessing allegations of suspected child abuse and neglect, and intervening to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children subject to ongoing intervention, in accordance with legislation, policies and procedures. 
  • Child Safety Officer - Child Safety After Hours Service Centre

    An authorised officer under the Child Protection Act 1999 appointed to the position of child safety officer (CSO) working in the Child Safety After Hours Service Centre (CSAHSC). This position is responsible for delivering statutory child protection services, such as investigating and assessing allegations of suspected child abuse and neglect, and intervening to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children subject to ongoing intervention, in accordance with legislation, policies and procedures.

  • Child Safety Service Centre

    Child Safety Service Centres (CSSC) are located across the state and staff in CSSC's deliver statutory child protection services and support to children, young people, families and carers to ensure children's safety and wellbeing and to prevent children from being harmed. 
  • Child Safety staff

    Staff who work for the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women, and are responsible for delivering services under the Child Protection Act 1999.
  • Child Safety Youth and Women Specialist Services

    Provide support statewide to children and young people in contact with the child safety system who have a disability, mental health needs, and/or complex and high risk behavioural, psychological or emotional needs. Services are provided through two service teams: Specialist Services team and Transition and Post Care Support team.
  • Child sexual exploitation

    Child sexual exploitation is a form of sexual abuse. When a child or young person is exploited, the abuser gives them things such as gifts, drugs, money, status and affection in exchange for performing sexual activities. Children and young people are often tricked into believing they are in a loving and consensual relationship. This is referred to as grooming. They may trust their abuser and not understand that they are being abused. A perpetrator of child sexual exploitation can be any age, gender or race. The relationship may be framed as a friendship or a romance. Children and young people who are exploited may also be used to find or coerce others to form relationships with abusers or join groups whose members are abusers. 

  • Child strengths and needs assessment

    The child strength and needs assessment (CSNA) is a structured decision making (SDM) tool that uses a consistent approach to consider each child’s strengths and needs when gathering information to use in developing or reviewing a case plan. It is used when the child requires ongoing intervention.
  • Childrens Court

    The Childrens Court (Magistrates Court) hold proceedings about applications by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women or the Director of Child Protection Litigation regarding protecting children from harm.
  • CIB

    Part of the Queensland Police Service, the Criminal Investigation Branch has primary responsibility for investigating and detecting crime.
  • Collaborative assessment and planning

    The collaborative assessment and planning (CAP) framework is a tool that enables a balanced and comprehensive child protection assessment to be undertaken with families and their networks.  It is used collaboratively with all the significant people involved with a child from the first point of contact with a family right through until case closure. The process involves the use of the framework to organise all information known about a child and family at any given time into key domains relevant to the goal of enhancing ongoing safety, belonging and wellbeing for children.

    The CAP framework tool is also used in supervision and case consultations to bring clarity and focus to case work and case planning, and is a critical step in the development of rigorous and long-term family-centred plans.

  • Collaborative family decision-making

    Collaborative family decision making (CFDM) is a Child Safety program that facilitates family-led decision making (FLDM) processes. Regional or district teams are made up of a principal team leader (PTL) and family group meeting convenors (FGMCs). 
  • Community based order

    Under the Youth Justice Act 1992, a community based order refers to a probation order, community service order, intensive supervision order or conditional release order.
  • Community Justice Groups

    Community Justice Groups are funded through the Queensland Government usually made up of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from within a specific community. Community justice groups are responsible for developing alcohol management plans. Once a group is established it has the authority to:
    • make declarations about dry places within its community
    • provide recommendations to the government and to any Community Liquor Licence Board about canteen operations
    • make recommendations to the minister administering the Liquor Act 1992 about declarations of restricted areas
    • implement local strategies to address justice issues in its community.
  • Community Visitor

    A Community Visitor is an independent officer employed by the Office of the Public Guardian to visit children and young people in care, to promote and protect their rights, interests and wellbeing. Community visitors visit children and young people living in visitable locations across Queensland including the home of a foster or kinship carer, a residential care facility, a youth detention centre, a disability service or a mental health facility.

  • Community Visitor Program

    The Community Visitor Program forms part of the statutory framework of the Public Guardian Act 2014. Under the program, community visitors help protect the rights and interests of children and young people living in visitable locations across Queensland. A visitable location for a child in care includes the home of a foster or kinship carer, a residential care facility, a youth detention centre, a disability service or a mental health facility.
  • Complex support needs allowance

    The complex support needs allowance is a payment to assist foster and kinship carers to meet the direct and additional indirect costs of caring for children assessed as having complex and extreme needs, to ensure each child's individual need are met in a timely and effective manner.

    Long-term guardians and permanent guardians are eligible to receive the complex support needs allowance is they were an approved foster or kinship carer and caring for the child when the order was made and exceptional circumstances apply.  In exceptional circumstances, the complex support needs allowance may be paid to long-term guardians for a maximum period of six months.

    The complex support needs allowance may be provided for a child in a care arrangement in addition to the payment of the fortnightly caring allowance and the high support needs allowance.

  • Concurrent planning

    Concurrent planning is a process that supports the identification of a primary permanency goal and an alternative permanency option with a child and family. The aim of concurrent planning is to expedite permanency for a child, and it requires actions to be developed and progressed for both goals, to be worked on simultaneously from the time a child comes into care, until a permanency decision is made.
  • Conduct disorder

    A disorder diagnosed in childhood or adolescence that presents through a range of emotional problems and antisocial behaviours. Conduct disorder presents as a repetitive and persistent pattern of behaviour in which the basis rights of others or major age appropriate norms are violated.

  • Contact order

    An order made by the Family Court of Australia, under the Family Law Act 1975, regarding the contact between a child and another person or other people.
  • Co-response

    This is a response delivered in partnership between Child Safety and non-government organisations, during an investigation and assessment, to assess a family’s support needs, determine the most suitable services, and facilitate connections for families with ongoing support services. 
  • Court assessment order

    A  court assessment order (CAO) is an order made under the Child Protection Act 1999,  to authorise actions necessary as part of an investigation and assessment to assess whether a child is in need of protection, if:
    • the child's parents have not provided their consent for these actions or the parents consent cannot be obtained,
    • it is considered that it will take more than three business days to complete the investigation and assessment.
  • CPA

    The cultural practice advisor (CPA) is a Child Safety Service Centre-based,  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (identified) position that provides individualised and culturally appropriate casework support to children and families, and cultural leadership in the CSSC, to support culturally appropriate work with children and families.
  • CPIU

    The Child Protection and Investigation Unit is the Queensland Police Service unit responsible for the investigation of crimes committed against children.

  • CPLO

    The Child Protection Liaison Officer (CPLO) within each Queensland Health Service District is the Queensland Health contact person for Child Safety staff.  The CPLO will be able to advise Child Safety staff about the model of care within their district and the health professionals within the local area who are able to conduct the health assessments and develop health plans. CPLOs may be able to advise on and facilitate appropriate referral processes and they will act as the main liaison link for other health professionals within the health service district. 

  • CPO

    A child protection order is an order made by the Childrens Court under the Child Protection Act 1999, when a child is assessed to be in need of protection. There are different types of child protection orders, depending on a child and family's situation. Child protection orders include a directive order, supervision order, custody order and guardianship orders. 
  • CRC

    Child related costs (CRC) refer to financial support provided to children and young people subject to statutory intervention, in accordance with an approved case plan. Child related cost reimbursement is approved for costs that are specific to the child or young person’s individual needs over and above the financial support provided in the fortnightly caring allowance. The provision of these funds is not automatic. It is assessed based on a child or young person’s individual needs and is approved by the manager of the Child Safety Service Centre.
  • Crime and Corruption Commission

    The Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) is an independent Queensland Government entity created to combat and reduce the incidence of major crime and to continuously improve the integrity of, and to reduce the incidence of misconduct in, the Queensland public sector. 
  • Criminal offences relating to harm to a child

    Where it is reasonably believed that alleged harm to a child may have involved the commission of a criminal offence relating to the child, the details of the harm must immediately be provided to the QPS, Child Protection Act 1999, section 14(2) and(3).  The harm must be reported to QPS, regardless of the decision about the intake response.
  • Critical incident

    A critical or major  incident is one that will negatively impact, or has the potential to negatively impact, on the safety, wellbeing and best interests of a person subject to Chid Safety intervention. It refers to any incident of sufficient criticality to require reporting to the Deputy Director-General via a 'critical incident report' form.

    Critical incidents may relate to:
    • children subject to departmental intervention
    • departmental staff and carers
    • departmentally funded or licensed services
    • matters where media attention has occurred or is possible.
  • Cultural practice advisor

    The cultural practice advisor (CPA) is a Child Safety Service Centre-based,  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (identified) position that provides individualised and culturally appropriate casework support to children and families, and cultural leadership in the CSSC, to support culturally appropriate work with children and families.
  • Cultural safety

    The term cultural safety was first defined by the Maori nursing fraternity in New Zealand and is expressed as an environment that is safe for people where there is no assault, challenge or denial of their identity, of who they are and what they need. It is about shared respect, shared meaning, shared knowledge and experience, of learning, living and working together with dignity and truly listening (Williams, Robyn, 2008). Cultural safety: what does it mean for our work practice? Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health. 23(2): 213-214.

  • Cultural support plan

    The cultural support plan is an essential component of the case plan for an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child or a child from another cultural community. It is completed when a child is in need of protection, to ensure they remain connected with their culture, families and communities regardless of where they are living.
  • Cumulative harm

    Harm experienced by a child as a result of a series or pattern of harmful events and experiences that may have occurred in the past or are ongoing. There is a strong possibility of multiple inter-related risk factors existing over critical developmental periods. The effects of cumulative harm can diminish a child’s sense of safety, stability and wellbeing.
  • Custody

    In accordance with the Child Protection Act 1999, a person who has or is granted custody of a child has the right and responsibility to attend to day-to-day matters only, including:
    • a child's daily care
    • making decisions about a child's daily care.
  • Custody order

    In accordance with the Child Protection Act 1999, a custody order is a child protection order granting custody of a child to a relative of the child or the chief executive, with the parents retaining guardianship of the child.
  • Detention order

    A detention order is an order made under the Youth Justice Act 1992, in relation to a child found guilty of a serious offence, requiring the child to be detained for a specified period of time, in a detention centre.
  • Differential pathway response

    This is an alternative option for finalising an investigation and assessment, without completing an action that would ordinarily be carried out by a CSO. A differential pathway enables the timely completion of an investigation and assessment without compromising the safety of a child. There are two types of differential pathways:
    • core assessment
    • contact with another professional.
  • Directive order

    This is an order made under the Child Protection Act 1999, directing a parent:
    • to do or refrain from doing something directly related to the child's protection, and/or
    • not to have contact (direct or indirect) with the child, or to only have contact when a stated person or a person of a stated category is present.
  • Director Child Protection Litigation

    The Director Child Protection Litigation (DCPL) is an independent statutory agency in the Department of Justice and Attorney-General portfolio which conducts child protection legal matters.

    The Director of Child Protection Litigation Act 2016 provides that when the chief executive of Child Safety is satisfied that a child is in need of protection and a child protection order is the most desirable and appropriate order to protect the child, it must refer the matter to the DCPL.  DCPL is responsible for applying for child protection orders and conducting child protection proceedings before the Childrens Court.

  • Director-General

    Unless otherwise specified, refers to the Director-General of the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women.
  • Disability support plan

    Refers to the support plan developed by the service provider in consultation with parents, outlining the disability supports that will be provided to a child during the length of an individualised disability accommodation and support (IDAS) arrangement.
  • Disability support service case

    A Child Safety support service case is planned in consultation with a child, the child's parents and service providers, to support a child with disability.  It includes establishment of an individualised disability accommodation and support (IDAS) arrangement.
  • Disability support service case plan

    Case plan developed in consultation between Child Safety, the child, the child's parents and service providers, outlining the goals and actions of the disability support service case.  It outlines the goals of the disability support service case and the actions that will be taken by each party toward achieving the goals to meet the child's needs.
  • Disqualified person

    The Working with Children (Risk Management and Screening) Act 2000, section 169, defines a disqualified person as someone who:

    • has been convicted of a disqualifying offence
    •  is a reportable offender with current reporting obligations under the
      Child Protection (Offender Reporting) Act 2004
    •  is subject to an offender prohibition order, a disqualification order or a sexual offender order.
    They are disqualified from applying for, or holding, a blue card.
  • Disrupted attachment

    Disrupted attachment is the negative affect a history of separation or traumatic events has had on a child's opportunity and ability to form close bonds with their parents or primary care givers in early childhood.

  • Domestic violence order

    A domestic violence order (DVO) is an official document issued by the court to stop threats or acts of violence. It sets our rules that the respondent (the person who has committed domestic violence) must obey. It is designed to keep the aggrieved person (the person who has had violence against them) safe by making it illegal for the respondent to behave in specific ways.
    There are 2 types of DVO:

    • a protection order made by a magistrate in court to protect people in domestic and family violence situations which usually last for 5 years but can be made for shorter or longer periods in some circumstances
    • a temporary protection order that a person who needs urgent protection, or police, can apply for if a person needs protection urgently. It is designed to protect those in danger up until the date a magistrate can decide the application for a full protection order.

    If a person is in immediate danger, they can ask for a temporary protection order and a protection order.

    Every domestic violence protection order has a standard condition that the respondent must be of good behaviour and not commit domestic violence against the aggrieved person or any other person named on the order, including children, relatives or friends, if they are at risk of violence.

  • Duplicate concerns

    Duplicate concerns refers to two or more accounts being received by Child Safety relating to a single incident or event or concern.
  • DVO

    A DVO (domestic violence order) is an official document issued by the court to stop threats or acts of violence. Refer to the glossary definition of Domestic violence order for further information.

  • eDocs

    eDOCS is a departmental recording  keeping system used to create, track and maintain physical files and archive boxes. The department maintains confidentiality of its records by controlling the level of access for all users. The ability of a user to view a departmental file can be restricted by their approved level of access.
  • Early childhood early intervention

    The NDIS has a national approach to early childhood, early intervention (ECEI) that gives children 0-6 years of age quick access to support tailored to their needs.  Early childhood, early intervention support aims to promote the child's learning, development and ability to participate in family, early childhood education and care settings and broader community life. It also aims to assist parents and families to have the knowledge, skills and support to respond to the needs of their child. 

  • Education support plan

    Child Safety provides funding to the Department of Education to develop an education support plan (ESP) in collaboration with Child Safety to ensure a child in care is enrolled and participating in an educational program that meets their individual learning needs, maximises their educational potential and improves their wellbeing. All children subject to an interim or finalised child protection order granting custody or guardianship to the chief executive are eligible for an ESP. 
  • Electronic Transfer of Court Results

    The Electronic Transfer of Court Results (ETCR) is a report of court results received in the Integrated Client Management System (ICMS) from the Department of Justice and Attorney General via the IJIS (Integrated Justice Information Strategy) application.
  • Emotional harm

    Emotional harm refers to the circumstances when a child’s social, emotional, cognitive or intellectual development is impaired or at unacceptable risk of being impaired as a direct result of parental behaviour/attitude. It includes significant emotional deprivation due to persistent coldness, rejection or hostility. The harm to the child may have a cumulative effect and/or be observable in behaviours such as severe anxiety, depression, withdrawal, indicators of inappropriate attachment or bonding, self-harming behaviour or aggressive behaviour towards others.
  • Evolve

    Evolve Interagency Services (Evolve) provide therapeutic and behaviour support services for children and young people in out-of-home care, under an interim or finalised child protection order granting custody or guardianship to the chief executive, who have severe and complex psychological needs.

    Evolve is a collaborative arrangement between the Child Safety, Queensland Health and the Department of Education.

  • Exemption card

    Registered teachers and police officers are exempt from requiring a blue card or exemption card when providing regulated child-related services as part of their professional duties (that is, teaching at a school or providing a function as a serving member of the Queensland Police Service).

    However, when providing regulated child-related services that fall outside of their professional duties, registered teachers and police officers must apply to Blue Card Services for an exemption card.  Examples of this include when a police officer is volunteering at a local sporting club or community group and / or a registered teacher is working in a child care centre or private tutoring business.

  • Experienced significant detriment by department

    In ICMS, this alert is applied to a child's person record when a child's harm or injury, leading to a permanent incapacity, has been caused by the actions or inactions of Child Safety.
  • Family and Child Connect

    Family and Child Connect (FaCC) are funded non-government community-based intake and referral services that helps families to care for and protect their children at home. Family and Child Connect support vulnerable families by assessing their needs and connecting them with appropriate support services.

  • Family contact

    Family contact may include contact between the child and their siblings, parents, extended family, community members, people of cultural or ethnic significance and other people of significance in the child's life.
  • Family Court of Australia

    The Family Court of Australia is a federal (Commonwealth) court established under the Family Law Act 1975, to deal with a range of matters arising out of relationship breakdowns, including divorce, property settlement and the care of children of a relationship.
  • Family Group Meeting

    A Family Group Meeting (FGM) is a meeting where Child Safety and a child, their family and significant people involved with the child and family meet to discuss the child and family's strengths and needs, and to develop a plan to address the worries identified. The plan aims to identify how the family and service providers can work together to keep the child safe and ensure the family and child receive the help and support they need.
  • Family Participation Program

    The Family Participation Program (FPP) is an external program run by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisations, funded by Child Safety. The program facilitates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family-led decision making processes and may assist children and families to identify an independent person to facilitate their participation in significant decisions being made under the Child Protection Act 1999.

  • Family reunification assessment

    Family reunification assessment (FRA) is a structured decision making (SDM) tool that supports decisions about whether the child can be returned home, to continue working towards reunification or to stop working towards reunification and consider alternative permanency options. It includes an evaluation of risk, contact and progress with case plan goals.

  • Family risk evaluation

    The family risk evaluation (FRE) is a structured decision making (SDM) tool completed at the conclusion of the investigation and assessment. It contains 23 child and parent characteristics, which when scored provide an estimate of how likely it is that a family will re-abuse or neglect their child within the next 12 -24 months. It supports decision-making about whether Child Safety needs to start ongoing intervention with the family and how often Child Safety will visit the child and family.

  • Family risk re-evaluation

    The family risk re-evaluation (FRRE) tool is a structured decision making (SDM) tool that re-estimates the likelihood that there will be further abuse or neglect in the family based on information gathered since the FRE was completed or the case plan was last reviewed. There are three items to be responded to in the tool: the risk level from the first or most recent risk evaluation tool, the family’s progress with the case plan, and whether there have been any other substantiations of harm or risk of harm since the last risk evaluation.

  • Family support service

    Family support services support vulnerabe children, young people and their families and expectant parents and aim to:
    • improve the wellbeing and safety of children, young people and their families
    • help preserve families
    • prevent entry or re-entry to the statutory system.
  • Family-led decision making

    Family-led decision making is a practice approach in which the family is supported in taking the lead in making decisions and plans and taking action to meet the safety, belonging and wellbeing needs of the child. 
  • Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder

    Foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) refers to a range of physical, cognitive, developmental and emotional problems caused by exposure of a foetus to alcohol during pregnancy.  Consequences may be serious and lifelong. 

  • Fortnightly caring allowance

    The fortnightly caring allowance is a payment provided to foster and kinship carers for each child in their care to assist with the basic costs of caring for the child. It is also paid to long-term guardians and permanent guardians who were approved carers for the child prior to becoming the child's guardian.  It is paid fortnightly in arrears and rates of payment differ depending on the age of the child.

  • Foster and kinship care service

    Foster and kinship care services are funded to recruit, train, assess and support foster and kinship carers and to manage and monitor the quality of care arrangements provided to children and young people. Services operate in a particular region and Child Safety Service Centre catchment areas. Services identify carers best able to meet the needs of children and young people referred by Child Safety.

  • Foster care matching tool

    The foster care matching tool assists Child Safety and foster and kinship care services in working together to identify the most suitable care arrangement for a child.

    The tool records information about the child and the proposed carer to assess the level of match between the child's needs and characteristics and the carer's skills, knowledge and ability to meet the relevant needs. It also helps to identify supports, services or strategies that may assist in addressing any gap in the match.

  • Foster carer

    A foster carer is an individual, or two or more individuals approved by Child Safety to provide family-based care for children in their own home. Foster carers undergo a thorough screening, assessment and training process prior to being approved, to assess their ability to provide care for children in line with the legislated standards of care and to provide them with support to do so.
  • Foster carer agreement

    An agreement negotiated between each foster carer and Child Safety and the foster and kinship care service, that sets out the terms, conditions and responsibilities of the foster carer and the CSSC or foster and kinship care service. The agreement sets out the type of care the carer wishes to provide and how the carer's development, learning and support needs will be met.
  • Gender and sexual identity

    Gender and sexual identity refers to all diversities of sex characteristics, sexual orientations and gender identities, without the need to separately specify each of the identities or characteristics. It includes lesbian, gay, bisexual, intersex and queer people. The acronym LGBTIQ+ is sometimes used to refer to lesbian, gay, bisexual, intersex and queer people collectively. 'Gender and sexual diversity' better reflects the diversity within these categories than the acronym. It refers to a community of people who share some things in common, but recognises there is also diversity within these categories.

  • Genogram

    A graphic representation, similar to a family tree, that illustrates demographical, biological, and household information about the relationships between family members.

  • Gillick

    Gillick competence is a term used in medical law to describe when a child may be competent to consent to their own medical treatment, despite their age. The standard is based on a decision of the United Kingdom's House of Lords in the case of Gillick v West Norfolk and Wisbech Area Health Authority [1985] 3 AII ER 402. The health professional decides if the child is able to provide consent for medical procedures based on the concept of 'Gillick competency'.

  • Guardianship

    In accordance with the Child Protection Act 1999, a person who has or is granted guardianship of a child has the powers, rights and responsibilities to:

    • attend to a child's daily care
    • make decisions that relate to day-to-day matters concerning the child's daily care
    • make decisions about the long-term care, wellbeing and development of the child in the same way a person has parental responsibility under the Family Law Act 1975.
  • Guardianship order

    A guardianship order is a child protection order which grants guardianship of the child to a relative of the child, another person, or the chief executive.

  • Hallucination

    An hallucination is an experience in which a person perceives or senses something that is not present. A person may, for example, see, hear, feel, taste or smell things that are not apparent to others.

  • Harm

    Any detrimental effect of a significant nature on a child's physical, psychological or emotional wellbeing. Harm can be caused by physical, psychological or emotional abuse or neglect, or sexual abuse or exploitation. Harm can be caused by a single act, omission or circumstance; or a series or combination of acts, omissions or circumstances (Child Protection Act 1999, section 9). 

  • Harm household

    The harm household is the household where harm to a child is alleged to have occurred. This is relevant when a child lives part time with more than one parent, and there may be no harm in one household, but alleged harm in the other.

  • Harm report

    A harm report is recorded where information indicates that a child in a care arrangement has experienced harm or it is suspected that they have experienced harm, and the harm or suspected harm may have involved the actions or inactions of a carer, household member or the staff member of a licensed care service.

  • Health assessment

    A comprehensive health assessment undertaken by a health professional for a child in care includes:

    • physical and developmental assessments
    • nutritional assessments
    • immunisation status review
    • assessment of psychosocial and behavioural issues
    • visual, dental and hearing screens
    • mental health screens.
  • Health care file

    The health care file is a physical client file that is registered in Child Safety's records management system and cross-referenced to the child's file. It contains all health related information about a child in care and a copy of the child health passport.

  • Health plan

    A health plan is a plan developed by a health professional following the health assessment of a child, valid for 12 months. It is made up of:

    • significant findings from the health assessment
    • a proposed health/treatment plan including who is responsible for carrying it out
    • recommended follow-up and timeframe
    • actions to be taken.
  • Health practitioner

    A health practitioner is:

    • a nurse under the Nursing Act 1992, or
    • a person registered under any of the following Acts:
    • Dental Practitioners Registration Act 2001
    • Medical Practitioners Registration Act 2001
    • Occupational Therapists Registration Act 2001
    • Optometrists Registration Act 2001
    • Physiotherapists Registration Act 2001
    • Psychologists Registration Act 2001,or
    • Speech Pathologists Registration Act 2001,or
    • a person who is eligible for membership of the Australian Association of Social Workers (Child Protection Act 1999, schedule 3).
  • High risk team

    A team of officers from all agencies with a role in keeping victims of domestic and family violence safe and holding perpetrators to account.

    Officers from police, health, corrections, housing and specialist domestic and family violence services work together to rapidly identify victims at high risk of violence who need urgent intervention.  Team members collaborate to provide integrated, culturally appropriate safety responses to victims and their children who are at high risk of serious harm or lethality.

  • High support needs allowance

    The high support needs allowance is a payment to assist foster and kinship carers to meet the direct care costs of caring, in an approved care arrangement, for children who are assessed as having high support needs, when the costs regularly exceed the scope of the fortnightly caring allowance.

    Long-term guardians and permanent guardians may be eligible to receive the high support needs allowance if they were an approved foster or kinship carer for the child when the order was made. In exceptional circumstances, the high support needs allowance may be paid to long-term guardians and permanent guardians for a maximum period of six months.

  • Household member

    Household members include all persons who have significant in-home contact with a child, including those who have a familial or intimate relationship with any person in the home. The person does not have to permanently reside in the home to be considered a household member. 

  • iDocs

    iDocs is an easily searchable repository for the storage of electronic client files, including all types of supporting documents and media formats. iDocs is being progressively implemented in Child Safety.

  • IJIS notification

    An IJIS notification is an automated email alert to a Regional Intake Service (RIS) or  Child Safety Service Centre (CSSC) providing details of a child’s first scheduled appearance in a criminal court proceeding.  Information may also be received on other participants in the court event. These ‘secondary persons of interest’ may or may not have an existing person record in ICMS.
  • ILO

    The ILO facilitates Child Safety's interstate liaison functions. They are situated within Court Services.
  • Immediate harm indicator

    Immediate harm indicators (behaviours or conditions) focus on key parental behaviours or household conditions that present a serious and immediate threat of harm to a child. The indicators are considered for every child in every investigation and assessment, and are assessed following the initial interviews with the child and family, and prior to leaving the home. The harm indicators focus on whether there are imminent or present dangers for the child.

  • Immediate safety plan

    An immediate safety plan is an agreement between a child's family, other relevant people and Child Safety. It outlines what Child Safety is worried might happen and what everyone agrees to do immediately to keep the child safe.  It is completed when one or more immediate harm indicators are identified during the safety assessment.

  • Independent entity

    An Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child, their parent or family member may choose to have an Independent Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander entity for a child (referred to as an independent person in practice) help them meaningfully participate in significant decisions being made about the child under the Child Protection Act 1999.   Child Safety and the Child Protection Litigation Director must, in consultation and with the consent of the child and family, arrange for an independent person to help facilitate the child or family's participation in a significant decision unless the child or family does not consent or one of the conditions in the Child Protection Act 1999, section 6AA(3) or (4) applies.

  • Independent person

    An Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child, their parent or family member may choose to have an independent person help them meaningfully participate in significant decisions being made about the child under the Child Protection Act 1999.   Child Safety and the Child Protection Litigation Director must, in consultation and with the consent of the child and family, arrange for an independent person to help facilitate the child or family's participation in a significant decision unless the child or family does not consent or one of the conditions in the Child Protection Act 1999, section 6AA(3) or (4) applies.
  • Information co-ordination meeting

    An information co-ordination meeting provides a discussion forum for SCAN team core members when a matter has been assessed by Child Safety as a child concern report and the SCAN team core member representative requires an opportunity for multi-agency discussion.

  • Intake

    Intake refers to the process by which Child Safety receives and gathers information about harm or risk of harm to a child or an unborn child who may be at risk of harm after he or she is born, and determines the appropriate response to the information received. Intake processes are initiated when professionals, family members or members of the public contact Regional Intake Services (RIS) or Child Safety Service Centres (CSSC) with concerns about a child. 
  • Intake enquiry

    An intake enquiry is one type of response to information received at the intake phase. It may be a request for information or it may relate to child wellbeing issues or child protection concerns.

  • Intake event

    An intake event is a record in ICMS where child protection information received from a notifier is recorded. The Child Safety response to the information is also recorded in the intake event. 

  • Intake form

    An ICMS form used to record child protection information received from a notifier.
  • Intake response

    Following an assessment of the information by Child Safety, one of the following responses is recorded:                                                                                           

    • safe place movement record
    • limited intake response
    • intake enquiry
    • child concern report
    • notification
    • additional notified concerns.
  • Integrated Client Management System

    The Integrated Client Management System is an electronic system for managing information about the children and families Child Safety works with and about care arrangements made with carers and care services.  It records professional activities such as assessments, plans and reviews undertaken with children, families and courts and information required to fulfil responsibilities under the Child Protection Act 1999.

  • Integrated Justice Information Strategy

    The Integrated Justice Information Strategy (IJIS) enables information to be shared between criminal justice agencies and Child Safety. IJIS provides court information from all Queensland criminal and civil jurisdictions via an email alert to the Regional Intake Service (RIS) or Child Safety Service Centre (CSSC) if the information relates to a child subject to a current investigation and assessment or ongoing intervention.
  • Intensive Family Support

    Intensive Family Support (IFS) services are funded by Child Safety to provide support to help families address multiple and/or complex needs and assist them to build their capacity to care for and protect their children.

  • Intensive foster and kinship care program

    Children may be placed with carers who provide intensive foster and kinship care if the child has complex and extreme support needs. Non-government agencies are responsible for recruiting, training, assessing and supporting carers to provide intensive foster and kinship care.
  • Intensive foster care program

    Children may be placed with carers who provide intensive foster and kinship care if the child has complex and extreme support needs. Non-government agencies are responsible for recruiting, training, assessing and supporting carers to provide intensive foster and kinship care.

  • Interim order

    On the adjournment of a proceeding for a court assessment or child protection order the Childrens Court has the power to make an interim order. An interim order made on adjournment of a court assessment order may grant temporary custody to the chief executive, or the child's parents will retain custody.  An interim child protection order will grant custody to a family member or the chief executive.

  • Interstate liaison officer

    The interstate liaison officer, situated in Court Services, facilitates Child Safety's interstate liasion functions.

  • Intervention with parental agreement

    Intervention with parental agreement refers to time-limited intensive intervention by Child Safety focusing on the safety, belonging, wellbeing and cultural needs of a child who is in need of protection, without the need for a court order. The child's parents agree to work cooperatively with Child Safety to keep the child safe, and are able and willing to work actively to reduce the level of risk in the home. The aim is to build the capacity of the family so they are able to meet the needs of the child following the intervention.

  • Interviewing children and recording evidence

    Interviewing Children and Recording Evidence (ICARE) is a training program designed to ensure that Child Safety staff undertake interviews of children in a way that minimises further trauma to the child and ensures information obtained from children meets judicial and legislation requirements.

  • Investigate allegations of harm

    When the chief executive becomes aware of alleged harm or alleged risk of harm (referred to in practice as notified concerns) and reasonably suspects that a child is in need of protection, an authorised officer will investigate the allegation and assess the child’s need of protection, or take other action as considered appropriate (Child Protection Act 1999, section 14(1)).
  • Investigation and assessment

    An investigation and assessment (I&A) is Child Safety's response to all notifications, and is the process of assessing a child’s need for protection, if there are allegations of harm or risk of harm to the child (Child Protection Act 1999, section 14 (1)).

  • Investigation and assessment event

    An investigation and assessment event is the place in ICMS where information about an investigation and assessment is recorded, including information gathered, structured decision making tool (SDM) tools, interviews, the assessment of the childs need for protection, and outcomes of the investigation and assessment.

  • Judicial transfer

    A judicial transfer is a decision made by the Childrens Court to transfer a child protection order to another state or territory. DCPL may apply to the Childrens Court for a Queensland child protection order to be transferred to another state or territory.

  • kicbox

    kicbox is a Child Safety app for young people aged 12 years and over, which provides a private, digital memory box that keeps everything safe and in one place. It also provides a convenient way for younger people to communicate and share information with their Child Safety team.

  • Kin

    Kin (Child Protection Act 1999 schedule 3) refers to:

    • any relatives of a child who are persons of significance to the child, and
    • anyone else who is a person of significance to the child.
  • Kinship carer

    A kinship carer is a person related to the child or a member of a child's community and considered family or a close friend who is approved by the department to provide an out-of-home care placement for the child. Kinship carers may be further categorised as:

    • grandparents
    • aunts/uncles
    • other relatives or close friend
    • for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, relative care may include another Aboriginal person or Torres Strait Islander who is a member of, or compatible with the child's community or language group.
  • Kith

    A person in a child's kinship network who is of significance to the child but may not be related to the child such as a friend or a member of the child's community. Refer to Kin.

  • Licensed care service

    A licensed care service (LCS) is a service operating under a licence, in accordance with the Child Protection Act 1999, to provide care arrangements for children in the custody or guardianship of the chief executive.  A licensed care service may provide family-based foster and kinship care services, or non-family based residential care services, with a number of different service delivery models possible under each service type.

    Care services must ensure that the care provided to children meets the required statement of standards in the Child Protection Act 1999.

  • Limited intake response

    A limited intake response (LIR) is a term used to describe information received at intake that does not relate to Child Safety core business and does not require any further action

  • Long-term guardian

    The Children's Court may grant long-term guardianship of a child to the chief executive or to a suitable person, other than a parent of the child, until the child is 18 years of age.

  • Long-term guardianship order

    A long-term guardianship order made under the Child Protection Act 1999, grants long-term guardianship of a child to a suitable family member (other than a parent of the child), another suitable person nominated by the chief executive, or to the chief executive until the child's 18th birthday.

  • Long-term guardianship to a suitable person

    A long-term guardianship order to a suitable person refers to an order made under the Child Protection Act 1999 that grants long-term guardianship of a child to a suitable family member (other than a parent of the child) or another suitable person nominated by the chief executive.

  • LTG-O

    A long-term guardianship order (LTG-O) made under the Child Protection Act 1999, grants long-term guardianship of a child to a suitable family member (other than a parent of the child), or another suitable person nominated by the chief executive.
  • Malicious notifier

    A malicious notifier is a person whose primary motive for contacting Child Safety is ill will towards another person, and who is not motivated by the best interests of the child.

  • Medical examination

    A medical examination is a physical, psychiatric, psychological or dental examination, assessment or procedure, and includes forensic examination and an examination or assessment normally carried out by a health practitioner (Child Protection Act 1999, schedule 3).

  • Mental health problem

    A mental health problem may interfere with how a person thinks, feels and behaves but to a lesser extent than a mental illness. Mental health problems are less severe than mental illnesses, but may develop into a mental illness if they are not effectively dealt with. 

  • MHR

    My Health Record is an Australian Government initiative providing an electronic summary of an individual's health information that can be shared securely online between an individual and registered healthcare providers involved in their care.

  • Minimum contact requirements

    Minimum contact requirements refers to the minimum number of times contact is required with a child and family during ongoing intervention and the contact standards that apply for in-home and reunification cases. Contact standards outline the minimum number, type and location of contact that must be arranged between the child safety officer, child safety support officer and other service providers, with the child and family.

  • Mobile family

    A mobile family alert is created in ICMS when attempts made to contact a family or a pregnant women during an investigation and assessment are unsuccessful or indicate the family or woman is transient.

  • My Health Record

    My Health Record is an Australian Government initiative providing an electronic summary of an individual's health information that can be shared securely online between an individual and registered healthcare providers involved in their care.

  • National Disability Insurance Agency

    The National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) is an independent statutory agency which implements the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), which supports Australians with a significant and permanent disability and their families and carers.

  • National Disability Insurance Scheme

    The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) established under the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013. It can fund help for people to receive reasonable and necessary supports.

  • NDIS national access team

    An NDIA team, within the NDIA Access and Workload Management Branch that with staff located around Australia to review NDIS access applications and decisions relating to a participant's eligibility for the NDIS.

  • NDIS plan

    An NDIS plan is a written agreement that outlines the individualised funding for disability supports to be provided for the child by the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

  • Neglect

    The child's basic needs of life are unmet by their parent to such an extent that the child's health and development are affected, causing harm, or likely to cause an unacceptable risk of harm to the child.

  • Nominated representative

    A My Health Record holder, or their authorised representative, can invite someone else to be their nominated representative to access their My Health Record. This might be the child's carer, family member or trusted friend. Three types of access can be given to a nominated representative - general access restricted access and full access. A nominated representative can access the person's information but cannot change it.

  • Non-government organisation

    A non-government organisation (NGO) is a not-for-profit community-managed organisation that receives government funding specifically for the purpose of providing community support services. Some NGO's may also receive funding from other sources.

  • Notification

    A notification is recorded where there is a reasonable suspicion that a child is in need of protection, that is, a child has been significantly harmed, is being significantly harmed, or is at risk of significant harm, and does not have a parent able and willing to protect them.

  • Notifier

    A notifier is a person who informs Child Safety that they reasonably suspect a child is in need of protection, or that an unborn child may be in need of protection after he or she is born. A notifier may be a child, family member, carer, a member of the community, another professional or a person mandated by law to report child protection concerns. A person providing this information is a notifier under the Child Protection Act 1999, section 22(1)(a) and 186(1), irrespective of how the information is recorded or responded to by Child Safety.

  • Office of the Child and Family Official Solicitor

    The Office of the Child and Family Official Solicitor (OCFOS) is an in-house legal unit providing early and independent information and legal advice to Child Safety Service Centres in relation to the commencement of child protection applications in Queensland.

  • Office of the Public Guardian

    The Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) is an independent statutory office established to protect the rights, interests and wellbeing of children and young people in the child protection system and adults with impaired decision-making capacity.

    Every child or young person living at a visitable site is entitled to receive services from a Community Visitor or Child Advocate - Legal Officer. Visitable sites include the home of a foster or kinship carer, a residential care facility, a youth detention centre, a disability service or a mental health facility.

  • Ongoing intervention

    Ongoing intervention (OI) refers to intervention by Child Safety that occurs with a child and their family following the completion of an investigation and assessment, when it is assessed that:

    • a child is in need of protection
    • an unborn child is in need of protection following their birth
    • a child is not in need of protection, but the level of risk in the family is ‘high’.

    Ongoing intervention may also occur in certain circumstances for a young person who has previously been a child in need of protection, following their eighteenth birthday.

  • Ongoing intervention (OI) event

    An ongoing intervention (OI) event is created in ICMS to record information relating to the ongoing intervention services provided to a child and family.

  • Other child

    Other child is a term used in ICMS to indicate a child who is a relevant person to an event, but who is not the subject child of the event. At intake, the decision to record a child as an ‘other child’ is based on a professional assessment of the notified concerns, the child protection history, the ages and vulnerability of the child and the family context.

  • Our Child

    Our Child is a real-time, multi-agency information sharing platform, allowing Child Safety Officers and Queensland Police Officers access to important child data from Child Safety, the Department of Education, Office of the Public Guardian, Youth Justice and Queensland Health.

  • Parent

    In the Child Protection Act 1999 , the definition of parent varies across different sections. Section 11 has a broader meaning of parent than the definition that applies in other sections.
    Child Protection Act 1999 :

    • section 11
    • section 23
    • section37
    • section 51AA
    • section 51F
    • section 52
    • section 205
  • Parental strengths and needs assessment

    The parental strengths and needs assessment is a structured decision making (SDM) tool that uses a consistent approach to considering each parent’s strengths and needs when gathering information for the development or review of a case plan.

  • Parenting order

    A parenting order is a set of orders made by a court about parenting arrangements for a child. A court can make a parenting order based on an agreement between the parties (consent orders) or after a court hearing or trial. When a parenting order is made, each person affected by the order must follow it.

  • Permanency

    Permanency planning recognises the life-long benefits enduring relationships afford children and prioritises a child's need for a permanent living situation in case planning. Permanency planning aims to meet a child's need for relational, physical and legal permanency.  

  • Permanent care order

    A permanent care order (PCO) is an order made by the Childrens Court that grants guardianship of a child to a suitable person (other than the parent of the child or the chief executive), nominated by the chief executive. It is one way that a child's needs for permanency can be met. It may be suitable when a child cannot be safety reunified with their parents and the child requires a permanent home that can provide them with stability as well as physical, relational and legal permanency.

  • Permanent guardian

    A permanent guardian is a person (other than a parent or the chief executive) who is granted long-term guardianship of a child by the Children's Court under the Child Protection Act 1999, section 61(f)(g).

    A permanent guardian is responsible for meeting a child or young person’s daily care and long-term needs like any other guardian of a child or young person subject to a child protection order.

  • Person of a stated category

    A directive order may specify that a parent's contact with a child can occur only in the presence of a specific person or in the presence of a category of person, such as a CSO, police officer or an employee of a specific non-government agency.
  • Person record

    A person record is created in ICMS to store information relating to a specific person. Each record has the capacity to store data such as a person's names/s, date of birth, cultural identity, contact details, family and other relationships, child protection history and alerts.
  • Physical harm

    Physical harm refers to circumstances where a child has suffered, or is at an unacceptable risk of suffering, serious physical trauma or injury of a non-accidental nature, due to the actions of their parent

  • Physical permanency

    Physical permanency refers to the experience of having stable living arrangements with connections to the child's community, which meet the child's developmental, educational, emotional, health, intellectual and physical needs.  Physical, relational and legal permanency are central to meeting a child's safety, belonging and wellbeing needs.

  • Placement

    Placement refers to when a child is 'placed' in an approved care arrangement, under the authority of the Child Protection Act 1999, due to intervention by the Child Safety. The words 'placement' and 'care arrangement' have the same meaning.

  • Placement agreement

    A placement agreement is a written agreement between Child Safety and the carers for a child in a care arrangement, excluding placements with parental consent, which:

    • provides the relevant information known by the department about the child, and sufficient information to allow the carers to provide adequate care for the child and ensure the safety of a child, the carers and other members of the carer's household
    • records the agreed support and services to be provided to the carers.
  • Placement event

    A placement event is created in ICMS to record details of a child's care arrangement including its start and end date and the service or organisation with which the child's carer is affiliated. Placement related documents and forms are saved in the event. 

  • Placement Services Unit

    A Placement Services Unit (PSU) is responsible for managing a continuum of care arrangement options for children in care. It is the conduit for all care arrangement referrals from Child Safety Service Centres to external placement service providers, and facilitates a transparent matching process. A PSU also coordinates all carer applications and approvals and implements process to govern individualised funded care arrangements.

  • Policy override

    A policy override option exists in some SDM tools for specific circumstances if the risk response outcome of an SDM tool needs to be overridden with the application of professional judgement. If it is decided that an override is warranted, the reasoning for this will be documented, reviewed and approved by a senior team leader.

  • Practice panel

    A practice panel is an internal process in which Child Safety engages with partners and critical friends, to facilitate a structured case discussion.  The aim of the practice panel is to elicit information and increase critical thinking through analysis and reflection at key decision making points. This is then used in making decisions about outcomes for children, young people and families.

  • Pre-notification check

    A pre-notification check is an enquiry by a CSO to another professional, an external agency or an interstate or international child protection jurisdiction, to gather further information about allegations of harm to a child, to determine if the concerns meet the threshold for a notification. A pre-notification check cannot be conducted for an unborn child.

  • Prescribed entity

    A prescribed entity includes any of the entities listed in section 159M of the Child Protection Act 1999.

  • Pre-sentence report

    Before it sentences a child found guilty of an offence, a court may order the chief executive, Department of Justice and Attorney-General, to give to the court a pre-sentence report concerning the child and containing specified information, assessments and reports relating to the child or the child's family or other matters.

  • Private arrangements

    When the outcome of a safety assessment is ‘unsafe’ and the child needs to reside outside the home for a period of time due to the level of risk identified, the parents may agree to take protective action and arrange for the child to stay with a family member or friend. For a private arrangement, the parent, not Child Safety, places the child with the person, and the person does not need to be approved as a carer. It is a non-custody arrangement and will only be for a short period of time, generally two to three days, to allow parents time to take immediate actions required to address the safety issues identified.

  • Problem sexual behaviours

    Problem sexual behaviours refer to the sexual behaviour of children under the age of criminal responsibility (10 years). Where a child under 10 years of age displays problem sexual behaviours that are abusive in nature, the behaviour is described as problem sexual behaviours which are abusive in nature.

  • Procedural order

    A procedural order is an order the court can make about actions to be carried out during a period of adjournment as outlined in the Child Protection Act 1999, section 68. The purpose of the action is to assist clarify and resolve, if possible, issues related to the child's protection.  The order may result in a report being prepared for the court to assist it make a decision in relation to an application.

  • Professional notifier

    A professional notifier is a professional who informs Child Safety that they reasonably suspect a child is in need of protection, or that an unborn child may be in need of protection after he or she is born. A professional notifier may have provided the information unsolicited or as part of an interview or conversation during an investigation and assessment.
  • Properly made

    The ‘Application for approval – Form 3 APA’ is properly made only when it has been completed, signed and dated by the applicant and each adult member of their household, has all appropriate identification documents attached, and is lodged at a Child Safety Service Centre or Placement Services Unit.

  • Protective needs

    A child’s protective needs are those that the child requires in order to be physically and emotionally safe in their home environment and would normally be the responsibility of the child’s parents.  The child’s protection and care needs will be based on any immediate harm indicators identified as part of the safety assessment, in the family risk evaluation and any other information gathered as part of the investigation and assessment. At the completion of an investigation and assessment, the child’s protective needs should be able articulated and used to in the case planning process if there is to be ongoing intervention with a child. The child’s protective needs must be addressed before the child can safely remain in the care of the parents, without departmental intervention.

  • Provisional approval

    A provisional approval authorises a person to care for a specific child while their application to be a foster or kinship carer is assessed. Provisional approval is valid for a maximum of 60 days. However, it may be extended for a further 30 days. Provisional approval cannot exceed 90 days. It is expected that the person's application to become an approved foster or kinship carer will be finalised during this time.

  • Provisionally approved carer

    A provisionally approved carer is a person who has been approved to care for a particular child for a defined period of time. A provisionally approved carer must have made an application to be either a foster or kinship carer.

  • Public entity

    Under the Human Rights Act 2019, a public entity is an organisation or body providing services to the public on behalf of the government or another public entity. There are two types of entities: core public entities that are public entities at all times (such as the public service and its employees), and functional public entities, that are only public entities when they are performing certain functions (such as a non-government entity engaged to deliver services to the public, on behalf of the government or another public entity). Both have the same obligations under the Human Rights Act 2019.

  • Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal

    The Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) is an independent, accessible tribunal that efficiently resolves disputes on a range of matters. The tribunal's purpose is to provide a quick, inexpensive avenue to resolve disputes between parties and make decisions.

  • Queensland Foster and Kinship Care

    Queensland Foster and Kinship Care (QFKC) is the peak body for foster and kinship carers. It is funded by the Queensland Government to represent and advocate for carers and to contribute to an inclusive and responsive family-based care system.

  • Queensland Police Service

    The Queensland Police Service is the principal law enforcement agency responsible for policing across Queensland.

  • Redress

    The National Redress Scheme provides support to people who have experienced institutional child sexual abuse. The establishment of a National Redress Scheme was recommended by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

  • Regional Intake Service

    Child Safety's Regional Intake Services (RIS) receive information and child protection concerns from community members and government and non-government agencies during business hours.

  • Relational permanency

    Relational permanency refers to the experience of having ongoing positive, loving, trusting and nurturing relationships with significant others including the child's parents, siblings, extended family members and carers.  Relational, physical and legal permanency are central to meeting a child's safety, belonging and wellbeing needs.

  • Reportable death

    A reportable death is recorded when information is received from the QPS about the death of a child. CSAHSC is responsible for managing all initial information pertaining to reportable deaths.  
  • Reportable suspicion

    A reasonable suspicion that a child in care has suffered, is suffering, or is at unacceptable risk of suffering, significant harm caused by physical or sexual abuse. Child Protection Act 1999, section 13F(2).

  • Residence order

    A residence order is an order made under the Family Law Act 1975, by the Family Court of Australia, regarding the person or persons with whom a child is to live.

  • Residential care service

    Residential care services are provided to a child or young person in a residential premise by paid employees or contract workers. Employees or workers may include rostered or live-in staff. Non-government residential care services are funded by Child Safety to provide an approved number of places for children and young people requiring a care arrangement.

    Residential care usually involves small group care (up to 6 places), but may also include individual care. Residential care is primarily for young people aged 12 - 17 years who have complex and extreme support needs. It may also accommodate sibling groups or other young people with moderate to high needs.

  • Respite

    Respite provides time-limited support to enhance a carer's ability to continue in their role as a primary carer for a child, and to sustain the caring relationship. For children in care, respite may include a placement (for the purpose of providing respite to the primary carer) or alternative respite options such as recreational camps.

  • Response priority

    Response priority is an Structured Decision Making (SDM) tool to guide the timeframe in which an investigation and assessment is to be commenced. There are three response timeframes are immediate or within 24 hours, within five days, or within 10 days.

  • Reunification

    Family reunification occurs when it is determined that a child's safety, belonging and wellbeing needs can best be met by returning the child to the care of their parent or parents.

  • Reviewable decision

    In accordance with the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal Act 2000, a reviewable decision is one made under an Act including the Child Protection Act 1999, that a person may apply to have reviewed by QCAT.

  • Risk assessment

    The assessment of risk is fundamental to a child's safety and is based on the analysis of information about the child, their family and their physical and social environment. Risk assessment involves a judgement about the likelihood of future harm and the vulnerability of the child and an estimation of the likely severity of any future incident of harm. The risk assessment helps determine the level of intervention required for those children who are considered to be at the highest risk.

  • Risk of harm

    Risk of harm is the probability or likelihood of a child suffering physical, psychological or emotional harm in the future. To make this assessment, the presence of risk factors and protective factors for the child must be considered and assessed. The outcome of a family risk evaluation is an important factor in this assessment. If there are significant risk factors identified, the CSO must assess whether any identified protective factors are able to adequately protect the child.

  • Safe and Together

    The Safe and Together™ Model (Mandel 2017) is a framework for partnering with domestic and family violence survivors and intervening with domestic violence perpetrators to enhance the safety and wellbeing of children. The model:
    • recognises that children's safety, belonging and wellbeing needs are best met if they can be kept safe and together with their non-offending parent
    • provides a suite of tools and interventions designed to help child safety professionals to become domestic violence informed 
    • uses a perpetrator pattern-based approach to assessment, intervention and safety planning for children, young people, parents and families who are affected by domestic and family violence.
  • Safe house

    Safe houses provide residential care services in remote Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander communities for children and young people under 18 years of age who have been assessed as having a moderate or high level of support need.  Safe house care is provided in a residential premise (not a carer's, or young person's, own home) by paid or contracted workers and/or volunteers.

  • Safe place movement record

    A safe place movement record is completed  when a child under 12 years is taken to a safe place and cared for until the child’s parents or a family member can resume the care of the child, under the Child Protection Act 1999, section 21.

  • Safety and support network

    A safety and support network is a team of family, friends, community members, carers and professionals who are willing to work with the child and the family to keep the child safe. Network members keep in regular contact with the child and their family, and take specific actions when there is danger and risk of harm to the child.

  • Safety and support plan

    A safety and support plan is developed with the child, family and their safety and support network following a structured decision making (SDM) safety assessment at any point in the child protection continuum to keep a child safe in the longer term (see also Immediate safety plan).

  • Safety assessment

    The purpose of a safety assessment is to assess the child's immediate safety and determine what interventions are required to keep them safe. A safety assessment will always occur at the commencement of an investigation and assessment and is the focus of the first contact with the child and family. Subsequent safety assessments are completed whenever new information becomes available or circumstances change significantly and/or a threat to a child's safety is indicated, or prior to closure of an ongoing intervention case.

  • SCAN team

    The Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) team, enables a coordinated response by core team member agencies (see SCAN team core members) to the protection needs of children by:

    • the sharing of information under part 4 of the Child Protection Act 1999 between members of the system
    • the planning and coordination of actions to assess and respond to children’s protection needs
    • providing a holistic and culturally responsive assessment of children’s protection needs.

    The SCAN team system is legislated in the Child Protection Act 1999 sections 159I – 159L.

  • SCAN team core member agencies

    The Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) team core members are representatives from Child Safety, Department of Education, Queensland Health and Queensland Police Service. From time to time, other prescribed entities or service providers may be invited by the core members to contribute to SCAN operations.

  • Screening criteria

    The screening criteria is a structured decision making (SDM) screening tool that assist the child safety officer who receives concerns about the harm or risk of harm to a child, to assess whether the concerns meet the threshold for a notification. The screening criteria is completed in ICMS and approved by a senior team leader. It is not used for standard of care concerns or for allegations of harm to a child in a care arrangement.

  • Screening tool

    The structured decision making (SDM) screening tool criteria provides definitions of neglect, physical harm, emotional harm and sexual abuse to assist in determining if information at intake meets Child Safety’s threshold for a notification. It is applied to all child protection allegations or concerns received by Child Safety about the harm or risk of harm to a child and is completed by the child safety officer recording the intake with review and approval by the senior team leader.

  • SDM

    Structured Decision Making® is a set of evidence-based assessment and decision-making guidelines designed to provide a high level of consistency and validity in the assessment and decision-making process. It is also a method for targeting resources to focus on families that are most likely to subsequently abuse or neglect their children. SDM assessments are used by professional Child Safety officers.
  • Secondary services

    Secondary services are early intervention services available to families who have needs that, if unmet, are likely to lead to children becoming in need of protection. Services are provided with the family's consent and aim to support families earlier before they reach the point of requiring tertiary interventions.  Non-government agencies in the family support sector usually have lead responsibility for the delivery of secondary services and the case management of clients.

  • Self determination

    Self determination is the process by which a person or family controls their own life. It supports the notion that families are the experts in their own lives and hold the knowledge to determine what is in their best interests and the best interests of there children. Self determination means something different for each person and family.
  • Self-harming behaviour

    Self-harming behaviour is the direct, deliberate act of harming one's body without the conscious intention to die.  Self-harm may result in death and is a risk factor for suicide.

  • Senior Education and Training Plan

    State schools ensure that students in Year 10 develop a Senior Education Training (SET) plan in partnership with their parents. The SET plan is a key component of a school’s career education program. It maps out a plan of action to put students on track for success in senior secondary, post-school education and work.

  • Senior team leader

    A senior team leader (STL) is a Child Safety position responsible for leading and supervising a team of child safety officers, in the delivery of collaborative frontline child protection services to children, their families and communities. A senior team leader also ensures that work complies with legislation, delegations, policies, procedures and quality standards.

  • Separate representative

    The separate representative is a court-appointed independent person who acts in the best interests of the child and ensures that all decisions about the child are made in line with this principle. The separate representative also ensures that the child's views and wishes have been obtained and that case plan goals will meet the protective needs of the child. The separate representative can make recommendations to the court or QCAT after considering all information available about the child's situation and can, if necessary, advise the other parties of their position in relation to the application.
  • Service provider

    A service provider is defined by the Child Protection Act 1999, as a 'prescribed entity' or another person providing a service to children or families. A prescribed entity is defined in the Child Protection Act 1999, section 159M, and includes (but is not limited to) the chief executive or an authorised officer.

  • Sexual abuse

    Sexual abuse is any sexual activity or behaviour that is imposed on a child and results in physical or emotional harm. It includes the inducement or coercion of a child to engage in, or assist any other person to engage in, sexually explicit conduct or behaviour for the sexual gratification or profit of the person responsible. It also includes circumstances where there is an unacceptable risk that the child may be sexually abused.

  • Sexually abusive behaviours

    Sexually abusive behaviours (SAB) refer to sexual behaviour of children, aged 10 years and over, displayed towards a person with less power. A child displaying sexually abusive behaviours can be charged with a criminal offence.

  • Sexually reactive behaviours

    Sexually reactive behaviours (SRB) is a term used to describe sexual behaviours in children and young people which are outside of what is developmentally expected. A child who has suffered adverse childhood experiences such as abuse or neglect may react or respond to situations in a sexual manner or may self-stimulate in response to stress. Sexually reactive behaviours include problem sexual behaviours, sexually abusive behaviours and high risk behaviours that are not harmful to others.
     
  • Short-term custody child protection order

    A short-term custody child protection order is an order made under the Child Protection Act 1999, where custody rights and responsibilities are granted to a kinship carer or to the chief executive (for a period of up to 2 years). Guardianship rights and responsibilities in relation to the child remain with the child's parents for the duration of the custody order.

  • Short-term guardianship order

    An order made under the Child Protection Act 1999, where guardianship rights and responsibilities in relation to the child, including matters associated with the child's daily care, are granted to the chief executive (for a period of up to 2 years) - see definition of guardianship.

  • Significant harm

    Significant harm is the threshold for harm that requires a statutory response from Child Safety. SDM definitions may describe the level of significant harm as:

    • serious - which is the higher end of significant harm, such as an injury requiring medical treatment
    • severe - which is the highest end of significant harm, such as an injury that is life-threatening or would cause permanent disfigurement or disability if untreated.
  • Sorry business

    Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples mourn the loss of a family member by following traditional ceremonies and practices, often known as 'sorry business'. Sorry business is an important time of mourning in which family and community members have responsibilities and obligations to attend funerals and participate in other cultural events, activities or ceremonies with the community.

  • Sortli

    Sortli (a contraction of the phrase 'sort out your life') is a free mobile app for young people to help them with their transition to adulthood. Sortli is a fun, informative and easy-to- navigate app that can be installed on Apple, Android or Microsoft mobile devices.

  • Specialist service coordinator

    Child Safety regionally based position which provides advice and guidance in relation to children and young people with high and complex disability support needs who are in care or at risk of entering the child protection system.

  • Specialist service provider

    A specialist service provider is a prescribed entity that is a non-government entity funded by the state or Commonwealth to provide a service to a relevant child or the child’s family.  A relevant child is a child in need of protection or a child who may become a child in need of protection if preventative support is not given to the child or child’s family.  Examples of a specialist service provider include Family and Child Connect Service (FACC), Intensive Family Support (IFS) Service or Assessment Service Connect (ASC).

  • Spiritual abuse

    Spiritual abuse is the denial or use of spiritual or religious beliefs and practices to control or dominate a person. Spiritual abuse can happen as part of domestic and family violence and alongside other types of abuse, such as physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse and financial abuse.
  • Standards of care

    The statement of standards (Child Protection Act 1999, section 122) sets out the standards by which children in care are to be cared for. These standards apply to all placements made under the authority of the Child Protection Act 1999, section 82(1). 

  • Standards of care review

    A standards of care review will be conducted in relation to a child in out-of-home care and placed with a carer or care service when:

    • concerns indicate that the care provided to the child may not have met the standards of care
    • the specific standards requiring review can be identified
    • there is no information that the child has experienced harm or is suspected to have experienced harm
    • a review is required to determine if the standards are being met, and where not met, what actions are required to meet the standards and improve the level of care provided to the child.
  • Statement of standards

    The Child Protection Act 1999, section 122, prescribes the chief executive's responsibility to ensure that a child placed in the care of an approved foster carer, licensed care service or departmental care service is cared for in a way that meets the statement of standards.

  • Statutory authority

    Legislative mandate given by the relevant legislation to carry out actions in accordance with the legislation.  The Child Protection Act 1999 provides Child Safety with statutory authority to administer the requirements of the Child Protection Act 1999 .
  • Structured Decision Making

    Structured Decision Making (SDM®) or (SDM) is an assessment and decision-making model to assist the child safety officer and team leader in making critical decisions about the safety of children. SDM was developed by the Children's Research Centre, and aims to:

    • reduce subsequent harm to children
    • reduce the time to permanency arrangements for children in out-of-home care.

    SDM is a set of evidence-based assessment and decision-making guidelines designed to provide a high level of consistency and validity in the assessment and decision-making process. It also is a method for targeting resources to families that are most likely to subsequently abuse or neglect their children. SDM assessments are to be used by professional departmental officers.

  • Subject child

    A child under the age of 18 years where the notified concerns indicate that the child has been harmed or is at risk of harm and it is reasonably suspected that the child is in need of protection, or an unborn child, where it is suspected that he or she will be in need of protection after birth.

  • Subsequent health assessment

    A subsequent health assessment is the process undertaken if the child has ongoing health issues, a health issue arises or the child has not had a health assessment for a significant period of time. The same process is used as for a health assessment (refer to ‘Health assessment’ and ‘Child health passport’).

  • Substantive application

    A substantive application is an application made by a person seeking to be approved as a foster or kinship carer under the Child Protection Act 1999.
    A person who has made such an application, may be provisionally approved to provide care for a limited time for a specific child while their application to become a foster or kinship carer is being assessed. A provisionally approved carer’s application to be approved as a foster or kinship carer is referred to as their substantive application.

  • Suicidal behaviour

    Suicidal behaviour is a range of actions related to suicide including:
    • suicidal ideation  thoughts of engaging in suicidal behaviour
    • suicide attempt a potentially self-injurious act intended to end one's life which does not result in death
    • suicide ― a self-injurious act intended to end one's life which results in death.
  • Suicide risk alert

    A suicide risk alert is recorded when it is assessed that a child is a high suicide risk. The child may be:

    • the subject of an intake enquiry, child concern report or notification, or
    • subject to departmental intervention (including through a support service, intervention with parental agreement, an assessment order or child protection order).

    A suicide risk alert in relation to a child subject to ongoing departmental intervention involves the development of an immediate and medium to long-term management strategy (including facilitating access to health services and programs) for addressing the child's physical health and emotional stability.

  • Supervision order

    A supervision order is an order made under the Child Protection Act 1999, requiring the chief executive to supervise the child's wellbeing and protection in relation matters stated in the order while the child remains in the parents' care.

  • Support person

    A support person is a person who is known and trusted by a child, a parent, or a carer, and chosen by the child, parent or carer to support them during a process, such as an investigation and assessment process or a standards of care review.

    It is not appropriate for the alleged person responsible for harm to be the support person for a child or a parent.

  • Support service case

    A support service case is a type of ongoing intervention that can only be used when:

    • an investigation and assessment has determined that a child is not in need of protection, however, the SDM family risk evaluation outcome is high, or
    • an investigation and assessment has determined that an unborn child will be in need of protection after birth, or
    • a young person requires support following their eighteenth birthday, where the young person was previously subject to either a child protection order granting custody or guardianship to the chief executive or a child protection order where an approved carer was subsequently granted long-term guardianship of the child.
    A support service case can be opened only if the child's parents, the pregnant woman or young person agree to work with Child Safety to reduce the likelihood of future harm to a child, reduce the likelihood of future harm to an unborn child or to provide ongoing support for a young person who has exited care and there are existing case planning goals and outcomes still to achieve.
  • Supported independent living

    Supported independent living (SIL) is a type of care arrangement for young people in care 15 to 18 years. It provides young people with accommodation and support workers but not live-in workers or carers.  This type of care arrangement may be suited to young people who are transitioning from care.

  • Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect team

    The Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) team enables a coordinated response to the protection needs of children by:

    • the sharing of information under part 4 of the Child Protection Act 1999 between members of the system
    • the planning and coordination of actions to assess and respond to children’s protection needs
    • providing a holistic and culturally responsive assessment of children’s protection needs.

    The SCAN team system is legislated in the Child Protection Act 1999 sections 159I – 159L.

  • Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect team core member agencies

    The members of the Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) team system are Child Safety, Department of Education, Queensland Health and the Queensland Police Service. From time to time, other prescribed entities or service providers contribute to the operation of the system at the invitation of the core members.

  • Systems and practice review

    The systems and practice review (SPR) team undertakes a systems and practice review of departmental involvement following the serious physical injury or death of a child who was known to Child Safety in the year prior to their injury or death or at the request of the Minister. Systems and practice reviews are conducted in accordance with Chapter 7A of the Child Protection Act 1999.
  • Systems and Practice Review Committee

    Review system implemented by Child Safety to review departmental involvement with children and young people who have died or suffered a serious physical injury. Findings are used to inform Child Safety policy, practice and professional development.
     
  • Temporary assessment order

    A temporary assessment order (TAO) authorises actions during the investigation and assessment process when parental consent cannot be obtained. A TAO can provide the authority to take a child into the custody of the chief executive, but guardianship rights and responsibilities remain with the child's parents. A TAO may also order specific actions relating to the assessment of a notification, for example, the conduct of a medical assessment in relation to a child. A TAO can only be granted for a period of 3business days and can be extended by 1 business day.

  • Temporary custody order

    A temporary custody order (TCO) authorises the actions necessary to secure the immediate safety of a child, pending a decision of what further action is necessary to meet the child’s protection and care needs. A TCO can provide the authority to take a child into the custody of the chief executive, but guardianship rights and responsibilities remain with the child’s parents. A TCO may also order specific provisions considered appropriate, for example, authorising a medical examination or directing contact. A TCO can only be granted for a period of three business days and can be extended by one business day if intending to apply for a child protection order.

  • Tertiary services

    Tertiary services are statutory ongoing interventions for children who, following completion of an investigation and assessment, are assessed as in need of protection. The goal of tertiary services is to ensure children in need of protection remain safe and to reduce the long-term implications of harm on their wellbeing and development.  Child Safety has lead responsibility for the delivery of tertiary services and the case management of clients.

  • Therapeutic residential care

    Therapeutic model of residential care provided for young people whose needs are unable to be met in home-based care or other residential services.  The aim of therapeutic residential care is to work with young people to support them in developing skills and the ability to regulate behaviour so that they can meet their goals and transition to a less intensive care arrangement.

  • Threshold for recording a notification

    The threshold for recording a notification is reached if information received indicates there is a reasonable suspicion that a child is in need of protection, that is: a child has been significantly harmed, is being significantly harmed, or is at risk of significant harm, and does not have a parent able and willing to protect them (Child Protection Act 1999, section 10 and 14).

  • Torres Strait Islander person

    A person of Torres Strait Islander decent who identifies as a Torres Strait Islander and is accepted as such by the community in which the person lives.
  • Transition officer

    Child Safety regionally based position responsible for providing direct support to a young person with a disability, mental health needs or complex and high risk behavioural, psychological or emotional needs, who is at risk of homelessness when they leave care.

  • Transition order

    The Childrens Court may make a transition order under the Child Protection Act 1999, section 65A, which has the effect of continuing an existing child protection order for a period of up to 28 days, to allow the child’s gradual transition from care arrangements to their parent's full-time care. A transition order cannot be extended.
    A transition order can be made when the court:

    • revokes a child protection order
    • decides an appeal against the making of the order in favour of a person other than the chief executive
    • refuses to extend the order or grant a further order before the order ends.
  • Transition plan

    A transition plan outlines how the chief executive will provide support and gradually transition a child into their parent's care, to minimise distress and disruption to the child. It also includes any other relevant matter, for example:

    • actions required to ensure the transition occurs within the period of the order
    • care and contact arrangements for the duration of the order.
  • Transition to adulthood

    Transition to adulthood planning is recorded within the case plan document and begins when a young person turns 15. The review of the support a young person requires to achieve their  transition to adulthood goals occurs at each case plan review or at least every 6 months.

  • Trauma informed

    Trauma-informed care and practice is based on understanding and knowledge of how trauma adversely affects child development and people's lives. It promotes physical, emotional and cultural safety.

  • Unacceptable risk of harm

    Unacceptable risk of harm refers to situations where the risk identified is probable, not possible, and likely to occur in the near future, where there are insufficient protective factors to ensure the child's safety without intervention by the department. The harm must be likely or probable, not just possible and may be a single act or series or combination of acts, omissions or circumstances that have a cumulative effect on the child’s safety and wellbeing. There must be a reasonable belief that the parents behaviour, actions or verbal statements or threats will result in harm to the child (Child Protection Act 1999, section 10).

    The assessment of whether there is unacceptable risk of harm, must take into consideration:

    • the outcome of the family risk evaluation
    • whether observations made directly or indirectly support the findings of the family risk evaluation
    • any risk factors for the child that are not raised in the family risk evaluation, that place the child at risk of harm in the future
    • whether there is a parent able and willing to protect the child from harm.
  • Unaccompanied humanitarian minor

    Unaccompanied humanitarian minor (UHM) are non-citizen children under 18 years who arrive in Australia without a legal parent. They may arrive either with a relative, an unrelated custodian or by themselves. Child Safety has accepted the delegated powers and functions of guardianship for UHM from the Australian government.

  • Visitable site

    The Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) is an independent statutory office established to protect the rights, interests and wellbeing of children and young people in the child protection system and adults with impaired decision-making capacity.

    Every child or young person living at a visitable site is entitled to receive services from a Community Visitor or Child Advocate - Legal Officer, Office of the Public Guardian (OPG). Visitable sites include the home of a foster or kinship carer, a residential care facility, a youth detention centre, a disability service or a mental health facility.

  • Warm telephone transfer

    A warm telephone transfer occurs when a Child Safety staff member speaks with another service provider before transferring a person's call to the other service, or with the person's agreement, arranges for the service to contact the person. Child Safety explains the caller's issue and reason for tranferring the call or referring them to the service.

  • Working with children check

    A detailed check of a person's national criminal history (including any charges, convictions or investigative information) and disciplinary information held on a person by certain professional organisations.

    Also known as a Blue Card check assesses an applicant's national criminal history, disciplinary information held by certain professional organisations, and relevant information from the Queensland Police Commissioner even if no charges were laid.

  • Worries

    Worries are the things Child Safety is concerned might happen to harm a child in the future:
    based on the assessment of past and/or current harm or if nothing changes.

  • Worry statement

    Worry statements document unacceptable risk of significant harm to a child and describe actions or inactions that may happen in the future to significantly harm the child if nothing changes.  They are developed to focus assessment and planning at different points on the child protection continuum.

  • Wrap around support

    Coordinated and collaborative service delivery by care team, treating professional and support agencies and the child's or family's support network to provide a holistic response to support case plan goals.

  • YJO

    An order made pursuant to the Youth Justice Act 1992.
  • Young person in contact with youth justice

    A young person in contact with youth justice system is someone who, after coming to the attention of police, is referred to a restorative justice conference, sentenced to a community-based order or detained in a youth detention centre.

  • Youth Justice

    The Department of Youth Justice is responsible for administering the Youth Justice Act 1992 and managing youth detention centres, youth justice service centres, youth justice conferencing and court proceedings and working with young people in contact with the youth system. Youth Justice staff support young people and supervise and monitor young offenders' progress as they carry out orders and bail programs.

    Youth Justice Services run programs aimed at preventing young people from reoffending, including programs to help young people build connections with their communities, learn about the consequences of their offending and increase their skills and confidence.

  • Youth Justice Order

    If a young person pleads guilty to or is found guilty of an offence, they will be sentenced under the Youth Justice Act 1992.  A youth justice order may be community -based or require that a child serve a specified period in detention. A court can make a range of orders including a good behaviour order, a fine, community service orders, supervised release order, probation order, graffiti removal order, conditional release order, intensive supervision order or detention order.