Skip to main navigation Skip to main content
Up-to-date information on how we are responding to COVID-19
Stay informed

Decide the type of intervention

After an investigation and assessment is completed, ongoing intervention must occur for a child assessed to be in need of protection. 

If a child is assessed to not be in need of protection but a family risk evaluation scored risk level is ‘high’, or if an unborn child is assessed to be in need of protection after birth, ongoing intervention is offered to the family or pregnant woman.

The three types of ongoing intervention are:

  • a support service case
  • intervention with parental agreement 
  • intervention with a child protection order.

Decide, in consultation with the senior team leader, which type of ongoing intervention is needed.

Attention

Deciding the type of ongoing intervention is a significant decision for an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child. In consultation, and with the consent of the child and their family, arrange for an independent person to assist their participation in decision making.

When deciding what type of ongoing intervention is needed and offered to the child and family, consider the following factors:

  • whether the child has been assessed as being in need of protection
  • the assessed level of risk to the child, including the outcome of the most recent safety assessment and family risk evaluation
  • what is needed to meet the child’s need for safety, belonging and wellbeing
  • what is needed to meet the child’s need for physical, relational and legal permanency 
  • what is needed to reduce the likelihood of future harm to the child
  • if the parents are able and willing to work with Child Safety
  • the views, information and family plan provided by the Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child and family at the family decision making meeting.

Note

Make sure a child’s immediate safety needs are met while a decision is being made about the appropriate type of ongoing intervention.

Consider providing a support service case only when:

  • a child is not in need of protection but the outcome of the family risk evaluation is ‘high’
  • it has been assessed that an unborn child will be in need of protection after birth
  • a young person requires transition to adulthood support after their 18th birthday and was previously subject to:
    • a child protection order granting custody or guardianship to the chief executive
    • a child protection order granting an approved carer long-term or permanent guardianship.

(For further information, refer to Procedure 4 Support service case with a young person.)

  • the child’s parents, a pregnant woman or a young person agree to work with Child Safety by participating in the development and implementation of a support plan.

Version history

Back to top

Published on:

Last reviewed:

  • Date: 
    Maintenance
  • Date: 
    Maintenance
  • Date: 
    Page created
  • Date: 
    Page created